HOME
INTRO
HISTORY
FAMILY STORIES
EMIGRANTS/ DESTINATIONS
CHURCH RECORDS
CIVIL RECORDS
HOMELAND VISITS
OLD WORLD RECORDS
END NOTES
censusRecords
  • Civil Records

  • Birth/Death/ Marriage

  • Naturalization Papers

  • Military Service

  • Census

  • Census records are among the most valuable of research aids in the construction of a family history. Rusyn immigration began in the late 1880's and all census reports after that date would be relevant. Unfortunately, the 1890 U.S. Census was destroyed by fire and invaluable records of immigration, labor patterns and genealogical data were lost forever. The U.S Census reports from 1900, 1910 1920 and 1930 exist, however, allowing us to trace our families through these decades. Creative spelling is required for this search. Do not just look for your own ancestors. Because of "chain migration" patterns, reviewing records from the entire village allows us to find others from the Peregrymka village area who served as neighbors, friends, godparents and witnesses for our own ancestors.

    The problem census taker had in describing the Rusyn identity is seen in these records. The same immigrants from one family in Hudson (Irishtown), Pennsylvania are described over four censuses as Austrian, Austrian- Russian, Russian , Austian- Ruthenian, Galician and Carpathian. Their "mother tongue" is described as Russian, Ruthenian and Polish. Other Peregrymka village immigrants can be found here: Rozdilski, Shtchur, Mirowsky. Horutz, Rock, Kulick, Homick, Hutz, Telep, Serafin, Klemas, Tkach, Dzama, Glowacz, Popovich, Krill, Drahas, Fundalewicz, Smarsz, Danielak and Cap. These records can be found on-line and also in Family History Centers. An example of how information from census records can be used in a family history is included.

    Copyright © 2017 A Village Cluster